Talk Story with Kaui Kitashima

June 25, 2021

Aloha Kakōu. In our 2nd edition of Talk Story, a new blog in which we sit down and talk story with a different member of the Timbers Kaua’i ʻOhana, we feature Kaui Kitashima. Kaui is our Resident Housekeeping Manager and beloved Ukulele Class Master. 

 

With one of the biggest smiles on Kauaʻi, and a heart to match, Kaui met with us to tell us his take on the true meaning of Aloha, and what makes Timbers Kauaʻi special to him. 

 

Kaui was born and raised on the island of Oahu. He moved to Kauaʻi ten years ago, and now calls the Garden Isle his home, with his four keiki, including a brand new baby. Kaui became a member of the Timbers ʻOhana in December of 2020, during Christmas week. We asked him a few questions, here are his answers.  

 

What is your kuleana, or job role, here at Timbers Kauaʻi? “Simple, the same job everyone has here. To make an amazing experience for every Owner and guest that visits us.” 

 

What do you think makes Timbers at Hokuala special or  unique?  “To me, its family, or ʻohana. It’s a great place for your family to become a part of our family. Everything surrounds that.” 

 

What is your favorite thing to do when you are not working? “ ʻOhana. When I’m not working it’s definitely my kiddos and whatever they want. Music and my kids. Or my kids playing music. Beach or park. Anything with my four keiki, I’m all in.”

 

What does Aloha mean to you? “To me, Aloha is super deep. When you go back to the origin of the word, Aloha, meaning “ha” – the breath of life, and aloha in the presence of that. The ha is deep for me itʻs our sustaining breath, it is our life force that comes from the depths of us. Aloha isnʻt a word, aloha is an action. When you express aloha, I think in essence, you are saying, here is my breath of life. Here is what sustains me and everything I have and I offer it to you as a gift, as an expression, as an action to sustain you. It’s the greatest welcome – sharing of yourself, itʻs the greatest act of love – giving of oneself and it’s the greatest farewell in giving of my life force to you to sustain you until we meet again.” 

 

What is special about Kauaʻi? “I think it goes back to ʻohana. On Oahu it’s so busy. Thatʻs what it is for me, ʻohana. And thatʻs what makes this place so special because it embodies what the island is like. ʻOhana and community should be one and the same. It should be a bunch of people coming together with love and respect, regardless of where we come from and what we are. Aunties and Uncles that my kids call Aunty and Uncle yet thereʻs no blood relation. The community has become ʻohana. I think that’s what’s special about the islands in general, but even more so on Kauaʻi.”

 

So beautiful. Now on a lighter note…

 

Favorite food in Hawaii? “For Kaua’i, it’s the Chili Pepper Chicken. North Shore General Store at the Princeville gas station.”

 

What is a fun fact most people don’t know about you? “I’ve performed at some of the biggest luau’s in the state. I guess technically I’m a professional musician because I get paid for it. I’ve traveled to play music. I’ve been to Japan and gone as far as Louisiana. I don’t play as much now because I have a new baby. Music is a passion, like after work people go to the beach, people go to the bar or the gym. I go play music.”

 

Mahalo Nui Loa, Kaui! Timbers Kaua’i is more special because you are here.